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How to Farm and Harvest Crops Properly

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How to Farm and Harvest Crops Properly
Posted On: July 8, 2021

Mom always told me to eat my vegetables. Contrary to popular belief, a diet consisting entirely of steak is unhealthy and expensive. Eating meat is for rich people, and since you’re probably not a rich person you should stick to growing crops. It’s time to pull your head out of the mines and head for the fields. Today we’ll be going over the various steps required to be a peasant farmer in Minecraft. If you’re a snowflake who refuses to kill animals in a fictional universe then this is the video for you. A man’s got to eat, after all. Why don’t you put down your pickaxe and grab a hoe.

Getting Seeds
When you think of farming in this game, the first thing that should come to mind is wheat, which is a vital resource for a variety of different things. You’re going to need wheat to breed cows and sheep because eating is apparently the only thing they understand. Wheat can also be used to make bread, which is a reliable food source early in the game and can also be used to breed villagers. Which is questionable. This should be the first farm you set up. Before you start planting you’re going to need wheat seeds, which can be obtained by breaking tall grass in certain biomes, such as plains. Basically, you have to act like a human lawnmower since there’s a small chance you’ll get wheat seeds when breaking each piece of grass. I like to use a water bucket to speed the process along since it can cover a lot of area when it’s placed. I like to get 2 stacks of seeds before starting. Wheat isn’t the only thing you should think about growing. Carrots and potatoes also have their uses, although they’re harder to find. The best way to get these crops is simply stealing them from villages. Although both carrots and potatoes aren’t very good sources of food, they can be great for trading.

Preparing the Land
Now that you have a handful of seeds to start farming, you’re going to need to find a good place to plant them. Ideally, you want to go for a large, open area with a lot of flat land. This will make harvesting and expanding much easier. To create farmland, you need to craft a hoe first. A hoe is a tool that could be crafted out of any of the base materials, such as stone or iron. Of course, the stronger metal you use, the longer it will last. I usually just craft a bunch of stone hoes to save iron. Simply right-click a grass or dirt block and it will turn into farmland. However, it won’t stay like that for long if there isn’t a source of water nearby. Farmland would eventually turn back into dirt blocks if they’re not hydrated. Just one block of water is enough to hydrate 4 dirt blocks in every direction, so one complete tile should be a nine-by-nine area with a space in the middle. If you do your math right, you can maximize an open area to grow as many crops as possible. Can you do me a favour? Don’t place your water in rows, there’s really no point in it. That’s just wasting space where you can grow more crops. Water should be placed 8 blocks away from each other for maximum efficiency. 

Harvesting
Don’t even think about harvesting your crops until they’re done. Crops grow in several stages, and there isn’t any real point in breaking them until they’ve reached maturity. You’ll just have to replant that spot and have nothing to show for it. It takes a maximum of two and a half Minecraft days for a crop to grow completely, which is roughly fifty-two minutes. If you don’t feel like waiting that long, you can use bonemeal on crops to make them grow faster, which of course is crafted from bones. It’s easier to wait until your entire farm is finished growing before you begin harvesting it. Picking and choosing is just plain tedious. I like to cover up the water with slabs so I don’t accidentally fall in when I’m harvesting the crops. Remember, crops need a certain amount of light to grow, so think twice before building a farm underground, although it could be done. Nothing is more soul-crushing than accidentally destroying your farmland. If you fall from just a single block in the air it will most likely break the crops below. You’ll have to use a hoe to fix the farmland so you can replant the crop. Just don’t jump on your crops, it’s that simple. This is also why it’s important to build a fence or wall around your farm to prevent mobs from doing the same. 

Extra Stuff
After harvesting a large wheat field, you’ll notice that you have a lot of seeds filling up your inventory that you don’t really need. Don’t just throw them out! You can build an automatic composter. With two hoppers, two chests, and a composter, you can turn those wheat seeds into bonemeal without having to do the work yourself. In regards to carrots and potatoes, there’s a way to increase the results of your harvest later in the game. By using a tool with Fortune to break the crops, preferably Fortune III, you’ll get significantly more profits. I wouldn’t recommend using a shovel, though. You might accidentally break the dirt blocks where your crops were growing.



[BACK]
How to Farm and Harvest Crops Properly
Posted On: July 8, 2021

Mom always told me to eat my vegetables. Contrary to popular belief, a diet consisting entirely of steak is unhealthy and expensive. Eating meat is for rich people, and since you’re probably not a rich person you should stick to growing crops. It’s time to pull your head out of the mines and head for the fields. Today we’ll be going over the various steps required to be a peasant farmer in Minecraft. If you’re a snowflake who refuses to kill animals in a fictional universe then this is the video for you. A man’s got to eat, after all. Why don’t you put down your pickaxe and grab a hoe.

Getting Seeds
When you think of farming in this game, the first thing that should come to mind is wheat, which is a vital resource for a variety of different things. You’re going to need wheat to breed cows and sheep because eating is apparently the only thing they understand. Wheat can also be used to make bread, which is a reliable food source early in the game and can also be used to breed villagers. Which is questionable. This should be the first farm you set up. Before you start planting you’re going to need wheat seeds, which can be obtained by breaking tall grass in certain biomes, such as plains. Basically, you have to act like a human lawnmower since there’s a small chance you’ll get wheat seeds when breaking each piece of grass. I like to use a water bucket to speed the process along since it can cover a lot of area when it’s placed. I like to get 2 stacks of seeds before starting. Wheat isn’t the only thing you should think about growing. Carrots and potatoes also have their uses, although they’re harder to find. The best way to get these crops is simply stealing them from villages. Although both carrots and potatoes aren’t very good sources of food, they can be great for trading.

Preparing the Land
Now that you have a handful of seeds to start farming, you’re going to need to find a good place to plant them. Ideally, you want to go for a large, open area with a lot of flat land. This will make harvesting and expanding much easier. To create farmland, you need to craft a hoe first. A hoe is a tool that could be crafted out of any of the base materials, such as stone or iron. Of course, the stronger metal you use, the longer it will last. I usually just craft a bunch of stone hoes to save iron. Simply right-click a grass or dirt block and it will turn into farmland. However, it won’t stay like that for long if there isn’t a source of water nearby. Farmland would eventually turn back into dirt blocks if they’re not hydrated. Just one block of water is enough to hydrate 4 dirt blocks in every direction, so one complete tile should be a nine-by-nine area with a space in the middle. If you do your math right, you can maximize an open area to grow as many crops as possible. Can you do me a favour? Don’t place your water in rows, there’s really no point in it. That’s just wasting space where you can grow more crops. Water should be placed 8 blocks away from each other for maximum efficiency. 

Harvesting
Don’t even think about harvesting your crops until they’re done. Crops grow in several stages, and there isn’t any real point in breaking them until they’ve reached maturity. You’ll just have to replant that spot and have nothing to show for it. It takes a maximum of two and a half Minecraft days for a crop to grow completely, which is roughly fifty-two minutes. If you don’t feel like waiting that long, you can use bonemeal on crops to make them grow faster, which of course is crafted from bones. It’s easier to wait until your entire farm is finished growing before you begin harvesting it. Picking and choosing is just plain tedious. I like to cover up the water with slabs so I don’t accidentally fall in when I’m harvesting the crops. Remember, crops need a certain amount of light to grow, so think twice before building a farm underground, although it could be done. Nothing is more soul-crushing than accidentally destroying your farmland. If you fall from just a single block in the air it will most likely break the crops below. You’ll have to use a hoe to fix the farmland so you can replant the crop. Just don’t jump on your crops, it’s that simple. This is also why it’s important to build a fence or wall around your farm to prevent mobs from doing the same. 

Extra Stuff
After harvesting a large wheat field, you’ll notice that you have a lot of seeds filling up your inventory that you don’t really need. Don’t just throw them out! You can build an automatic composter. With two hoppers, two chests, and a composter, you can turn those wheat seeds into bonemeal without having to do the work yourself. In regards to carrots and potatoes, there’s a way to increase the results of your harvest later in the game. By using a tool with Fortune to break the crops, preferably Fortune III, you’ll get significantly more profits. I wouldn’t recommend using a shovel, though. You might accidentally break the dirt blocks where your crops were growing.



How to Farm and Harvest Crops Properly

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